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Create better presentations faster. Upgrade your PowerPoint download to Microsoft , and get easy access to premium features like 3D, Inking. Microsoft Office brings you Word, Excel, and PowerPoint all in one app. Take advantage of a seamless experience with Microsoft tools on the go with the. This post offers you the Microsoft Office bit and bit full version free download, and shows you how to install them.
 
 

 

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This topic gives you step-by-step instructions and best practices for making your PowerPoint presentations accessible and unlock your content to everyone, including people with disabilities. PowerPoint has many features built-in that help people with different abilities to read and author documents. In this topic, you learn, for example, how to work with the Accessibility Checker to tackle accessibility issues while you’re creating your presentation.

You’ll also learn how to add alt texts to images so that people using screen readers are able to listen to what the image is all about. You can also read about how to use slide design, fonts, colors, and styles to maximize the inclusiveness of your slides before you share or present them to your audience.

Best practices for making PowerPoint presentations accessible. Check accessibility while you work. Create accessible slides. Avoid using tables. Add alt text to visuals. Create accessible hyperlink text and add ScreenTips. Use accessible font format and color. Use captions, subtitles, and alternative audio tracks in videos.

Save your presentation in a different format. Test accessibility with a screen reader. The following table includes key best practices for creating PowerPoint presentations that are accessible to people with disabilities. To find missing alternative text, use the Accessibility Checker.

Use the Accessibility Checker to find slides that have possible problems with reading order. A screen reader reads the elements of a slide in the order they were added to the slide, which might be very different from the order in which things appear.

Set the reading order of slide contents. Use built-in slide designs for inclusive reading order, colors, and more. To determine whether hyperlink text makes sense as standalone information, visually scan the slides in your presentation.

Tip: You can also add ScreenTips that appear when your cursor hovers over text or images that include a hyperlink. Turn on the Color filter switch, and then select Grayscale. Visually scan each slide in your presentation for instances of color-coding. People who are blind, have low vision, or are colorblind might miss out on the meaning conveyed by particular colors. Use an accessible presentation template. To find insufficient color contrast, use the Accessibility Checker. Strong contrast between text and background makes it easier for people with low vision or colorblindness to see and use the content.

Use accessible font color. To find slides that do not have titles, use the Accessibility Checker. People who are blind, have low vision, or a reading disability rely on slide titles to navigate.

For example, by skimming or using a screen reader, they can quickly scan through a list of slide titles and go right to the slide they want. Give every slide a title.

Hide a slide title. If you must use tables, create a simple table structure for data only, and specify column header information. To ensure that tables don’t contain split cells, merged cells, or nested tables, use the Accessibility Checker.

Use table headers. To find potential issues related to fonts or white space, review your slides for areas that look crowded or illegible. Make videos accessible to people who are blind or have low vision or people who are deaf or hard-of-hearing.

Subtitles typically contain a transcription or translation of the dialogue. Closed captions typically also describe audio cues such as music or sound effects that occur off-screen. Video description means audio-narrated descriptions of a video’s key visual elements. These descriptions are inserted into natural pauses in the program’s dialogue.

Video description makes video more accessible to people who are blind or have low vision. Include accessibility tags to PDF files you create from your presentation. The tags make it possible for screen readers and other assistive technologies to read and navigate a document.

Top of Page. The Accessibility Checker is a tool that reviews your content and flags accessibility issues it comes across.

It explains why each issue might be a potential problem for someone with a disability. The Accessibility Checker also suggests how you can resolve the issues that appear. In PowerPoint, the Accessibility Checker runs automatically in the background when you’re creating a document.

If the Accessibility Checker detects accessibility issues, you will get a reminder in the status bar. The Accessibility pane opens, and you can now review and fix accessibility issues. For more info, go to Improve accessibility with the Accessibility Checker. Tip: Use the Accessibility Reminder add-in for Office to notify authors and contributors of accessibility issues in their documents.

With the add-in, you can quickly add reminder comments that spread awareness of accessibility issues and encourage the use of the Accessibility Checker. For more info, go to Use the Accessibility Reminder to notify authors of accessibility issues.

The following procedures describe how to make the slides in your PowerPoint presentations accessible. For more info, go to Video: Create accessible slides and Video: Design slides for people with dyslexia. Use one of the accessible PowerPoint templates to make sure that your slide design, colors, contrast, and fonts are accessible for all audiences. They are also designed so that screen readers can more easily read the slide content. In the Search for Online templates and themes text field, type accessible templates and press Enter.

One simple step towards inclusivity is having a unique, descriptive title on each slide, even if it isn’t visible. A person with a visual disability that uses a screen reader relies on the slide titles to know which slide is which. Use the Accessibility ribbon to make sure every slide has a title. For instructions, go to Title a slide and expand the “Use the Accessibility ribbon to title a slide” section. You can position a title off the slide.

That way, the slide has a title for accessibility, but you save space on the slide for other content. For instructions, go to Title a slide and expand the “Put a title on a slide, but make the title invisible” section.

If you want all or many of your slide titles to be hidden, you can modify the slide master. For instructions, go to Title a slide and expand the “Systematically hide slide titles” section. If you’ve moved or edited a placeholder on a slide, you can reset the slide to its original design. All formatting for example, fonts, colors, effects go back to what has been assigned in the template. Restoring the design might also help you find title placeholders which need a unique title.

To restore all placeholders for the selected slide, on the Home tab, in the Slides group, select Reset. Some people with visual disabilities use a screen reader to read the information on the slide. When you create slides, putting the objects in a logical reading order is crucial for screen reader users to understand the slide. Use the Accessibility Checker and the Reading Order pane to set the order in which the screen readers read the slide contents. When the screen reader reads the slide, it reads the objects in the order they are listed in the Reading Order pane.

For the step-by-step instructions how to set the reading order, go to Make slides easier to read by using the Reading Order pane. PowerPoint has built-in, predesigned slide designs that contain placeholders for text, videos, pictures, and more. They also contain all the formatting, such as theme colors, fonts, and effects.

To make sure that your slides are accessible, the built-in layouts are designed so that the reading order is the same for people who use assistive technologies such as screen readers and people who see.

For more info, go to Video: Use accessible colors and styles in slides. Expand the Themes gallery and select the slide layout that you want. PowerPoint automatically applies this layout to the presentation.

In general, avoid tables if possible and present the data another way, like paragraphs with headings. Tables with fixed width might prove difficult to read for people who use Magnifier, because such tables force the content to a specific size. This makes the font very small, which forces Magnifier users to scroll horizontally, especially on mobile devices. If you have to use tables, use the following guidelines to make sure your table is as accessible as possible:.

If you have hyperlinks in your table, edit the link texts, so they make sense and don’t break mid-sentence. Make sure the slide content is easily read with Magnifier. Screen readers keep track of their location in a table by counting table cells.

Blank cells in a table could also mislead someone using a screen reader into thinking that there is nothing more in the table. Use a simple table structure for data only and specify column header information. Screen readers also use header information to identify rows and columns. Visual content includes pictures, SmartArt graphics, shapes, groups, charts, embedded objects, ink, and videos.

In alt text, briefly describe the image, its intent, and what is important about the image.

 
 

Powerpoint microsoft office 2010 free. Microsoft Powerpoint 2010 Free Download

 
 

Networking Software. Software Coupons. Visit Site. Premium Upgrade. Clicking on the Download Now Visit Site button above will open a connection to a third-party site. Developer’s Description By Microsoft. Full Specifications. What’s new in version Release June 24, Date Added June 26, Version Operating Systems. Additional Requirements None. Total Downloads 2,, The IDAutomation ActiveX Barcode Control is an easy-to-use graphic object that creates barcodes as images without the use of bitmaps or special fonts.

Generate multiple barcode types from a single font that is compatible with multiple operating systems and languages The software is free for personal use. It brings back the familiar Office and toolbars and menus into your Microsoft Office , or The following procedures describe how to make the slides in your PowerPoint presentations accessible.

For more info, go to Video: Create accessible slides and Video: Design slides for people with dyslexia. Use one of the accessible PowerPoint templates to make sure that your slide design, colors, contrast, and fonts are accessible for all audiences.

They are also designed so that screen readers can more easily read the slide content. In the Search for Online templates and themes text field, type accessible templates and press Enter.

One simple step towards inclusivity is having a unique, descriptive title on each slide, even if it isn’t visible. A person with a visual disability that uses a screen reader relies on the slide titles to know which slide is which.

Use the Accessibility ribbon to make sure every slide has a title. For instructions, go to Title a slide and expand the “Use the Accessibility ribbon to title a slide” section.

You can position a title off the slide. That way, the slide has a title for accessibility, but you save space on the slide for other content.

For instructions, go to Title a slide and expand the “Put a title on a slide, but make the title invisible” section. If you want all or many of your slide titles to be hidden, you can modify the slide master. For instructions, go to Title a slide and expand the “Systematically hide slide titles” section. If you’ve moved or edited a placeholder on a slide, you can reset the slide to its original design. All formatting for example, fonts, colors, effects go back to what has been assigned in the template.

Restoring the design might also help you find title placeholders which need a unique title. To restore all placeholders for the selected slide, on the Home tab, in the Slides group, select Reset. Some people with visual disabilities use a screen reader to read the information on the slide. When you create slides, putting the objects in a logical reading order is crucial for screen reader users to understand the slide.

Use the Accessibility Checker and the Reading Order pane to set the order in which the screen readers read the slide contents. When the screen reader reads the slide, it reads the objects in the order they are listed in the Reading Order pane.

For the step-by-step instructions how to set the reading order, go to Make slides easier to read by using the Reading Order pane. PowerPoint has built-in, predesigned slide designs that contain placeholders for text, videos, pictures, and more. They also contain all the formatting, such as theme colors, fonts, and effects.

To make sure that your slides are accessible, the built-in layouts are designed so that the reading order is the same for people who use assistive technologies such as screen readers and people who see. For more info, go to Video: Use accessible colors and styles in slides. Expand the Themes gallery and select the slide layout that you want. PowerPoint automatically applies this layout to the presentation. In general, avoid tables if possible and present the data another way, like paragraphs with headings.

Tables with fixed width might prove difficult to read for people who use Magnifier, because such tables force the content to a specific size. This makes the font very small, which forces Magnifier users to scroll horizontally, especially on mobile devices.

If you have to use tables, use the following guidelines to make sure your table is as accessible as possible:. If you have hyperlinks in your table, edit the link texts, so they make sense and don’t break mid-sentence.

Make sure the slide content is easily read with Magnifier. Screen readers keep track of their location in a table by counting table cells. Blank cells in a table could also mislead someone using a screen reader into thinking that there is nothing more in the table. Use a simple table structure for data only and specify column header information.

Screen readers also use header information to identify rows and columns. Visual content includes pictures, SmartArt graphics, shapes, groups, charts, embedded objects, ink, and videos. In alt text, briefly describe the image, its intent, and what is important about the image. Tip: To write a good alt text, make sure to convey the content and the purpose of the image in a concise and unambiguous manner.

Do not repeat the surrounding textual content as alt text or use phrases referring to images, such as, “a graphic of” or “an image of. Avoid using text in images as the sole method of conveying important information.

If you use images with text in them, repeat the text in the slide. In alt text of such images, mention the existence of the text and its intent.

PowerPoint for PC in Microsoft automatically generates alt texts for photos, stock images, and the PowerPoint icons by using intelligent services in the cloud.

Always check the autogenerated alt texts to make sure they convey the right message. If necessary, edit the text. For charts, SmartArt, screenshots, or shapes, you need to add the alt texts manually. For the step-by-step instructions on how to add or edit alt text, go to Add alternative text to a shape, picture, chart, SmartArt graphic, or other object and Video: Improve image accessibility in PowerPoint. In the Alt Text pane, spelling errors are marked with a red squiggly line under the word.

To correct the spelling, right-click the word and select from the suggested alternatives. In the Alt Text pane, you can also select Generate a description for me to have Microsoft cloud-powered intelligent services create a description for you. You see the result in the alt text field. Remember to delete any comments PowerPoint added there, for example, “Description automatically generated. Note: For audio and video content, in addition to alt text, include closed captioning for people who are deaf or have limited hearing.

People who use screen readers sometimes scan a list of links. Links should convey clear and accurate information about the destination. For example, avoid using link texts such as “Click here,” “See this page,” Go here,” or “Learn more. You can also add ScreenTips that appear when your cursor hovers over text or images that include a hyperlink. For example, this hyperlink text matches the title on the destination page: Create more with Microsoft templates.

For the step-by-step instructions on how to create hyperlinks and ScreenTips, go to Add a hyperlink to a slide. An accessible font doesn’t exclude or slow down the reading speed of anyone reading a slide, including people with low vision or reading disability or people who are blind. The right font improves the legibility and readability of the text in the presentation. For the step-by-step instructions on how to change fonts in PowerPoint go to Change the fonts in a presentation or Change the default font in PowerPoint.

To reduce the reading load, select familiar sans serif fonts such as Arial or Calibri. Avoid using all capital letters and excessive italics or underlines. A person with a vision disability might miss out on the meaning conveyed by particular colors. For headings, consider adding bold or using a larger font. The text in your presentation should be readable in a high contrast mode. For example, use bright colors or high-contrast color schemes on opposite ends of the color spectrum.

White and black schemes make it easier for people who are colorblind to distinguish text and shapes. Use the pre-designed Office Themes to make sure that your slide design is accessible. For instructions, go to Use an accessible presentation template or Use built-in slide designs for inclusive reading order, colors, and more.

Use the Accessibility Checker to analyze the presentation and find insufficient color contrast. It finds insufficient color contrast in text with or without highlights or hyperlinks in shapes, tables, or SmartArt with solid opaque colors.

It does not find insufficient color contrast in other cases such as text in a transparent text box or placeholder on top of the slide background, or color contrast issues in non-textual content. PowerPoint supports the playback of video with multiple audio tracks. It also supports closed captions and subtitles that are embedded in video files. Currently, only PowerPoint for Windows supports insertion and playback of closed captions or subtitles that are stored in files separate from the video.

For all other editions of PowerPoint such as PowerPoint for macOS or the mobile editions , closed captions or subtitles must be encoded into the video before they are inserted into PowerPoint. Supported video formats for captions and subtitles vary depending on the operating system that you’re using. Each operating system has settings to adjust how the closed captions or subtitles are displayed. For more information, see Closed Caption file types supported by PowerPoint. Closed captions, subtitles, and alternative audio tracks are not preserved when you use the Compress Media or Optimize Media Compatibility features.

Also, when turning your presentation into a video , closed captions, subtitles, or alternative audio tracks in the embedded videos are not included in the video that is saved. When you use the Save Media as command on a selected video, closed captions, subtitles, and multiple audio tracks embedded in the video are preserved in the video file that is saved.

Videos include an audio track with video descriptions, if needed, for users who are blind or have low vision. Videos that include dialogue also include closed captions, in-band closed captions, open captions, or subtitles in a supported format for users that are deaf or hard-of-hearing.

For more information, refer to Add closed captions or subtitles to media in PowerPoint. You can save your presentation in a format that can be easily read by a screen reader or be ported to a Braille reader. Before converting a presentation into another format, make sure you run the Accessibility Checker and fix all reported issues.

When your presentation is ready and you’ve run the Accessibility Checker to make sure it is inclusive, you can try navigating the slides using a screen reader, for example, Narrator.

Narrator comes with Windows, so there’s no need to install anything. This is one additional way to spot issues in the navigation order, for example. Press the Tab key to navigate the elements within the slide and fix the navigation order if needed. To move the focus away from the slide content, press Esc or F6.

You can trim video so your audience sees only the video content you want them to see. You also can add video effects, fades, and even create video triggers to launch animations during your presentation. These video bookmarks can be used to cue captions at specific points during a video, for example. When it’s a static presentation you’re working on–such as a publication, newsletter, or pamphlet–Office lets you color-correct and add artistic effects and borders to images so you won’t need a third-party image editor.

We found many of these features to be quite intuitive once we were able to track them down in their appropriate Ribbon tabs. Like many features in Office , it’s not the functionality that can be challenging, but rather the getting used to the feature that is.

Outlook has seen many notable feature improvements in Office , which will save users time in their daily e-mail tasks if they get past the initial learning curve. The new Conversation View lets you group threads together so you can view an entire conversation in one place. With plenty of competition in Google’s online Gmail search tools, Outlook needed to make attractive new features to continue to be competitive, and this feature makes searching through e-mail much easier. You also can run Clean Up to strip out redundant messages and threads so you have just the info you need without scanning through several e-mails.

Microsoft got mixed reviews during beta testing of this feature, but we think that this might be one of those features like the Ribbon that will become more useful as users become acclimated with a new way of doing things.

A new feature called Quicksteps lets you create macros for common daily tasks like regular forwarding of specific e-mails to third parties. Say you have sales e-mails from several parties that are sent to you on a regular basis, but need to go to another person within your company.

With Quicksteps you could custom create a macro that would automatically send that e-mail on with the click of a button. Like the Conversation View features, Quicksteps is not immediately intuitive, but after some study, it will save you an enormous amount of time processing e-mails in the future.

Even with the tweaks for simplifying your e-mail processing, Outlook still seems more in tune with large business clients than with smaller companies that could probably get by with online alternatives. New coauthoring in Word, PowerPoint, and OneNote, as well as advanced e-mail management and calendaring capabilities in Outlook, make collaboration much easier, reducing the time it takes to finish large projects with several contributors. Word and PowerPoint now have a syncing mechanism to avoid sudden changes while you’re working on a project a major concern in the beta.

We wonder how people will react to this specific change, since now the only way to have live coauthoring without the need to sync up changes will be through OneNote. In any case, offering access to shared documents in key business applications from anywhere is something any international business or business traveler can appreciate.

Google Docs, though not as elegant, are extremely easy to share with other users, so offering OneNote as the only option may not be enough. Live edits in OneNote are only one of the new features for Microsoft’s notebook-like application, however. Sketching out ideas, collaborating in real time, and adding images, video, audio, and text are all available in OneNote as it sits to the side of what you’re working on. This enables you to drop sections of text, images, and other tidbits into OneNote’s interface to keep all your ideas in one place.

An upgraded Navigation Bar makes it easy to jump between notebooks to copy or merge information. When you’re collaborating on a project, OneNote now features automatic highlighting so you can quickly find changes to your notebook since your last save. Features like these, along with new visual styles and a Web version with live changes, make OneNote the key collaborative tool of the suite.

Our only question is whether people will accept OneNote as their mainstay for live collaboration since it has less name recognition than bigger apps in the suite. In addition to upgraded collaboration tools, you’ll now be able to work on your documents anywhere with slimmed down Web-based versions of Word, PowerPoint, Excel, and OneNote. The Web based components will make sharing information easier whether it’s from your home computer, your phone, or when you’re traveling for business.

The Web apps preserve the look and feel of a document regardless of the device you’re working on–even if it’s your smartphone. These apps seem to work as advertised mostly, but we wonder how well the Web-based versions will work when server loads reach into the several millions of users.

What sets these apps apart from Google Docs and other services is that your documents and spreadsheets retain their formatting, giving Office ‘s Web apps a leg up against its online counterparts. Excel has received some tweaks as well, with easier-to-read, color-coded spreadsheets and smart tools to bring in the information you need.

In Excel , you can flip through the tabs to access formulas, insert diagrams and charts, and quickly import data from connected sources. A new feature called Sparklines lets you create a small chart in a single cell. This lets users compare data across multiple cells with added graphical elements to make them easier to read and spot trends over time. These moves seem to suggest that Microsoft is trying to make spreadsheets a little more accessible to a wider swath of users.

We welcome the new customization features, especially as Excel retains the powerful tools users have come to expect. Those who are involved in creating their own publications and newsletters will appreciate new changes to Publisher

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